Green River Fishing

The Green River below Flaming Gorge Dam is a world-renowned fly fishing stream; its clear, emerald waters support a large population of trout, with rainbows being more common just below the dam and browns dominating downstream. There are also some cutthroats in the river. Read more...

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Western Rivers Flyfisher

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Flaming Gorge-ous

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Fishing is restricted to artificial flies or lures; catch-and-release is highly encouraged but limited harvest is permitted (check the latest Utah proclamation for details). Fly tackle is most commonly used but spinners and Rapalas are also effective.

The Green flows through a scenic, steep-walled canyon. The rugged terrain allows access in only three areas: just below the dam, Little Hole and Browns Park. You can drive to those locations and fish your way up or down the stream, or float the river in a drift boat or rubber raft. (The river is also a popular destination for recreational rafters and can be busy on summer weekends.)

The browns are wild, produced by natural reproduction, and grown quickly in the fertile water. The average fish is 15-17 inches long. The record, a 29-pound brown, was caught in 1996.

Insect hatches are prolific. Scuds are a primary food source and are effective throughout the year. Midges work on and below the surface during the winter and early spring. Blue-winged olives hatch in incredible numbers in the spring. Big cicadas produce exciting fishing during the early summer; ants, hoppers and many dry fly patterns work well through the summer and early fall.

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